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Int J Mol Sci. 2017 Jul 6;18(7). pii: E1451. doi: 10.3390/ijms18071451.

Maternal Macronutrient Consumption and the Developmental Origins of Metabolic Disease in the Offspring.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3E 3P4, Canada. umkereli@myumanitoba.ca.
2
Diabetes Research Envisioned and Accomplished in Manitoba (DREAM) Research Theme of the Children's Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3E 3P4, Canada. umkereli@myumanitoba.ca.
3
Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3E 3P4, Canada. umbraweg@myumanitoba.ca.
4
Diabetes Research Envisioned and Accomplished in Manitoba (DREAM) Research Theme of the Children's Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3E 3P4, Canada. umbraweg@myumanitoba.ca.
5
Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3E 3P4, Canada. vdolinsky@chrim.ca.
6
Diabetes Research Envisioned and Accomplished in Manitoba (DREAM) Research Theme of the Children's Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3E 3P4, Canada. vdolinsky@chrim.ca.

Abstract

Recent research aimed at understanding the rise in obesity and cardiometabolic disease in children suggests that suboptimal maternal nutrition conditions organ systems and physiological responses in the offspring contributing to disease development. Understanding the mechanisms by which the macronutrient composition of the maternal diet during pregnancy or lactation affects health outcomes in the offspring may lead to new maternal nutrition recommendations, disease prevention strategies and therapies that reduce the increasing incidence of cardiometabolic disease in children. Recent mechanistic animal model research has identified how excess fats and sugars in the maternal diet alter offspring glucose tolerance, insulin signaling and metabolism. Maternal nutrition appears to influence epigenetic alterations in the offspring and the programming of gene expression in key metabolic pathways. This review is focused on experimental studies in animal models that have investigated mechanisms of how maternal consumption of macronutrients affects cardiometabolic disease development in the offspring. Future research using "-omic" technologies is essential to elucidate the mechanisms of how altered maternal macronutrient consumption influences the development of disease in the offspring.

KEYWORDS:

cardiovascular disease; developmental programming; high-fat diet; metabolic disease; sucrose

PMID:
28684678
DOI:
10.3390/ijms18071451
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