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BMC Med Educ. 2017 Jul 6;17(1):109. doi: 10.1186/s12909-017-0944-x.

Does the unexpected death of the manikin in a simulation maintain the participants' perceived self-efficacy? An observational prospective study with medical students.

Author information

1
Centre for Emergency Care Teaching (CESU 67), Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France.
2
Prehospital Emergency Care Service (SAMU 67), Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France.
3
College of the High Studies in Medicine (CHEM), Brest, France.
4
Emergency Departments Network in Alsace (RESURAL), Strasbourg, France.
5
Department of Simulation, Strasbourg Faculty of Medicine, Strasbourg, France.
6
Department of anesthesiology, Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France.
7
Centre for Training and Research in Health Sciences Education (CFRPS), Strasbourg Faculty of Medicine, Strasbourg, France.
8
Prehospital Emergency Care Service (SAMU 67), Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France. pelaccia@unistra.fr.
9
Centre for Training and Research in Health Sciences Education (CFRPS), Strasbourg Faculty of Medicine, Strasbourg, France. pelaccia@unistra.fr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The death of a simulated patient is controversial. Some educators feel that having a manikin die is prejudicial to learning; others feel it is a way of better preparing students for these situations. Perceived self-efficacy (PSE) reflects a person's perception of their ability to carry out a task. A high PSE is necessary to manage a task efficiently. In this study, we measured the impact of the death of a simulated patient on medical students' perceived self-efficacy concerning their ability to cope with a situation of cardiac arrest.

METHODS:

We carried out a single-centre, observational, prospective study. In group 1 (n = 27), pre-graduate medical students were warned of the possible death of the manikin; group 2 students were not warned (n = 29). The students' PSE was measured at the end of the simulated situation and after the debriefing.

RESULTS:

The PSE of the two groups was similar before the debriefing (p = 0.41). It had significantly progressed at the end of the debriefing (p < 0,001). No significant difference was noted between the 2 groups (p = 0.382).

CONCLUSIONS:

The simulated death of the manikin did not have a negative impact on the students' PSE, whether or not they had been warned of the possible occurrence of such an event. Our study helps defend the position which supports the inclusion of unexpected death of the manikin in a simulation setting.

KEYWORDS:

Death; Emergency medicine; Perceived self-efficacy; Simulation; Undergraduate medical students

PMID:
28683737
PMCID:
PMC5501339
DOI:
10.1186/s12909-017-0944-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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