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J Phys Act Health. 2017 Dec 1;14(12):905-912. doi: 10.1123/jpah.2016-0608. Epub 2017 Oct 12.

How Is the Practice of Yoga Related to Weight Status? Population-Based Findings From Project EAT-IV.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Yoga may provide a strategy for healthy weight management in young adults. This study examined prevalence and characteristics of young adults' yoga practice and associations with changes in body mass index.

METHODS:

Surveys were completed by 1830 young adults (31.1 ± 1.6 y) participating in Project EAT-IV. Cross-sectional and 5-year longitudinal analyses were conducted stratified by initial weight status.

RESULTS:

Two-thirds (66.5%) of nonoverweight women and 48.9% of overweight women reported ever doing yoga, while 27.2% of nonoverweight women and 16.4% of overweight women practiced regularly (≥30 min/wk). Fewer men practiced yoga. Among young adults practicing regularly (n = 294), differences were identified in intensity, type, and location of yoga practice across weight status. Young adults who were overweight and practiced yoga regularly showed a nonsignificant 5-year decrease in their body mass index (-0.60 kg/m2; P = .49), whereas those not practicing regularly had significant increases in their body mass index (+1.37 kg/m2; P < .01). Frequency of yoga was inversely associated with weight gain among both overweight and nonoverweight young adults practicing yoga regularly.

CONCLUSIONS:

Young adults of different body sizes practice yoga. Yoga was associated with less weight gain over time, particularly in overweight young adults. Practicing yoga on a regular basis may help with weight gain prevention.

KEYWORDS:

body weight; epidemiology; intervention study; obesity; youth

PMID:
28682698
PMCID:
PMC5865393
DOI:
10.1123/jpah.2016-0608
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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