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World J Surg. 2017 Oct;41(10):2545-2550. doi: 10.1007/s00268-017-4052-1.

Early Timing of Thyroidectomy for Hyperthyroidism in Graves' Disease Improves Biochemical Recovery.

Author information

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Frauenklinikstrasse 24, 8091, Zurich, Switzerland.
2
Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Raemistasse 100, 8091, Zurich, Switzerland.
3
Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091, Zurich, Switzerland.
4
Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091, Zurich, Switzerland.
5
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Frauenklinikstrasse 24, 8091, Zurich, Switzerland. gerry.huber@usz.ch.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The role of thyroidectomy as an early treatment for hyperthyroidism has been poorly investigated. Our aim was to examine its success rates, particularly focusing on thyroidectomy as an early treatment.

METHODS:

Patients with thyroidectomy for hyperthyroidism between February 2008 and October 2014 were included. They were divided into two groups (early and delayed thyroidectomy), and patient characteristics, treatment indications, complications and time to biochemical recovery were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Ninety-nine patients met the inclusion criteria, of whom 65 (66%) suffered from Graves' disease, 25 (25%) from toxic goiters and 9 (9%) from amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism. Structural abnormalities of the thyroid (39 patients, 39%) represented the most frequent indications for thyroidectomy. Forty-six patients (46%) underwent an early and 53 (54%) a delayed surgical approach. Patients with Graves' disease undergoing early thyroidectomy did not suffer more often from complications but had a significantly faster biochemical recovery after surgery than those with a delayed thyroidectomy, as judged by a shorter time to reach TSH (121 ± 24 vs. 240 ± 31 days, p = 0.007) and fT4 (91 ± 29 vs. 183 ± 31 days p = 0.015) levels in the normal range. As expected, there were no recurrences of hyperthyroidism.

CONCLUSIONS:

Early thyroidectomy was neither associated with permanent complications nor thyroid storm, but with a significantly improved biochemical recovery and therefore has to be recommended early in patients with Graves' disease.

PMID:
28681142
DOI:
10.1007/s00268-017-4052-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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