Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cold Spring Harb Protoc. 2017 Jul 5;2017(7):pdb.top077610. doi: 10.1101/pdb.top077610.

Chemostat Culture for Yeast Physiology and Experimental Evolution.

Author information

1
Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 maitreya@uw.edu.
2
Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195.

Abstract

Continuous culture provides many benefits over the classical batch style of growing yeast cells. Steady-state cultures allow for precise control of growth rate and environment. Cultures can be propagated for weeks or months in these controlled environments, which is important for the study of experimental evolution. Despite these advantages, chemostats have not become a highly used system, in large part because of their historical impracticalities, including low throughput, large footprint, systematic complexity, commercial unavailability, high cost, and insufficient protocol availability. However, we have developed methods for building a relatively simple, low-cost, small footprint array of chemostats that can be run in multiples of 32. This "ministat array" can be applied to problems in yeast physiology and experimental evolution.

PMID:
28679718
DOI:
10.1101/pdb.top077610
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center