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Fluids Barriers CNS. 2017 Jul 6;14(1):18. doi: 10.1186/s12987-017-0066-1.

Comparison of the sagittal sinus cross-sectional area between patients with multiple sclerosis, hydrocephalus, intracranial hypertension and spontaneous intracranial hypotension: a surrogate marker of venous transmural pressure?

Author information

1
Department of Medical Imaging, John Hunter Hospital, Locked Bag 1, Newcastle Region Mail Center, Newcastle, 2310, Australia. grant.bateman@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au.
2
Newcastle University Faculty of Health, Callaghan Campus Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia. grant.bateman@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au.
3
Newcastle University Faculty of Health, Callaghan Campus Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia.
4
Department of Neurology, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, Australia.
5
Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, Australia.
6
Department of Medical Imaging, John Hunter Hospital, Locked Bag 1, Newcastle Region Mail Center, Newcastle, 2310, Australia.

Abstract

There is evidence that patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and hydrocephalus share some common pathophysiological mechanisms. Alterations in CSF pressure are known to affect cerebral venous sinus geometry. To further explore these mechanisms, we measured the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) cross-sectional area 3 cm above the torcular using T2 images in 20 MS, 10 spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH), 21 hydrocephalus and 20 idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) patients and compared with 20 matched controls. The SSS area was reduced by 25% in hydrocephalus (p = 0.0008), increased by 22% (p = 0.037) in SIH and unchanged in IIH compared to matched controls. In MS there was a 16% increase in SSS area (p = 0.01).The findings suggest that changes in SSS cross-sectional are common between MS and SIH patients, while in hydrocephalus and IIH these are different.

KEYWORDS:

Hydrocephalus; Idiopathic intracranial hypertension; Multiple sclerosis; Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

PMID:
28679427
PMCID:
PMC5499004
DOI:
10.1186/s12987-017-0066-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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