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BMC Biol. 2017 Jul 6;15(1):58. doi: 10.1186/s12915-017-0396-0.

Q&A: using Patch-seq to profile single cells.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas, 77030, USA.
2
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Nobels väg 3, 171 65 Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children's Hospital, 1250 Moursund Street, Suite 1025.18, Houston, Texas, 77030, USA.
5
Department of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas, 77030, USA. astolias@bcm.edu.
6
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas, USA. astolias@bcm.edu.

Abstract

Individual neurons vary widely in terms of their gene expression, morphology, and electrophysiological properties. While many techniques exist to study single-cell variability along one or two of these dimensions, very few techniques can assess all three features for a single cell. We recently developed Patch-seq, which combines whole-cell patch clamp recording with single-cell RNA-sequencing and immunohistochemistry to comprehensively profile the transcriptomic, morphologic, and physiologic features of individual neurons. Patch-seq can be broadly applied to characterize cell types in complex tissues such as the nervous system, and to study the transcriptional signatures underlying the multidimensional phenotypes of single cells.

PMID:
28679385
PMCID:
PMC5499043
DOI:
10.1186/s12915-017-0396-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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