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Allergy Asthma Immunol Res. 2017 Sep;9(5):453-461. doi: 10.4168/aair.2017.9.5.453.

A Metagenomic Analysis Provides a Culture-Independent Pathogen Detection for Atopic Dermatitis.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea.
3
Asan Institute for Life Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
4
Division of Molecular and Life Sciences, Department of Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Korea.
5
Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Ajou University Medical Center, Suwon, Korea.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Allergy and Respiratory Center, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
8
Institute of MD Healthcare, Seoul, Korea.
9
Institute of MD Healthcare, Seoul, Korea. arraychip@gmail.com.
10
Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Allergy and Respiratory Center, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. bypyun@schmc.ac.kr.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disease, significantly affecting the quality of life. Using AD as a model system, we tested a successive identification of AD-associated microbes, followed by a culture-independent serum detection of the identified microbe.

METHODS:

A total of 43 genomic DNA preparations from washing fluid of the cubital fossa of 6 healthy controls, skin lesions of 27 AD patients, 10 of which later received treatment (post-treatment), were subjected to high-throughput pyrosequencing on a Roche 454 GS-FLX platform.

RESULTS:

Microbial diversity was decreased in AD, and was restored following treatment. AD was characterized by the domination of Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, and Streptococcus, whereas Alcaligenaceae (f), Sediminibacterium, and Lactococcus were characteristic of healthy skin. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed that serum could be used as a source for the detection of Staphylococcus aureus extracellular vesicles (EVs). S. aureus EV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin E (IgE) were quantified in the serum.

CONCLUSIONS:

A metagenomic analysis together with a serum detection of pathogen-specific EVs provides a model for successive identification and diagnosis of pathogens of AD.

KEYWORDS:

Atopic dermatitis; extracellular vesicle; metagenomic analysis

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