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J Dtsch Dermatol Ges. 2017 Jul;15(7):709-722. doi: 10.1111/ddg.13278.

Acne.

Author information

1
Dermatology Practice, Munich; Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany.
2
Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Abstract

Acne is a chronic disease with a high prevalence among adolescents. Key pathogenetic factors (and their clinical correlates) are increased sebum production (seborrhea), follicular hyperkeratosis (comedones), and perifollicular inflammation (papules and pustules). The disease is modulated by a variety of endogenous (androgens, IGF-1, neuroendocrine factors) and exogenous (Propionibacterium acnes, diet, friction, ingredients of medical or cosmetic topical products) triggers. Acne is associated with high morbidity, and even mild manifestations may potentially cause considerable impairment in quality of life. Effective topical and systemic treatments are available. Optimal therapeutic results require continuous patient management over the course of the entire treatment period as well as adjustment of treatment modalities based on symptoms and disease severity.

PMID:
28677199
DOI:
10.1111/ddg.13278

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