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Cell Stress Chaperones. 2018 Jan;23(1):45-53. doi: 10.1007/s12192-017-0822-9. Epub 2017 Jul 5.

The regulation of heat shock proteins in response to dehydration in Xenopus laevis.

Author information

1
Institute of Biochemistry and Department of Biology, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON, K1S 5B6, Canada.
2
Institute of Biochemistry and Department of Biology, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON, K1S 5B6, Canada. kenneth_storey@carleton.ca.

Abstract

African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) endure bouts of severe drought in their natural habitats and survive the loss of approximately 30% of total body water due to dehydration. To investigate molecular mechanisms employed by X. laevis during periods of dehydration, the heat shock protein response, a vital component of the cytoprotective stress response, was characterized. Using western immunoblotting and multiplex technology, the protein levels of HSP27, HSP40, HSP60, HSP70, HSC70, and HSP90 were quantified in the liver, skeletal muscle, kidney, lung, and testes from control frogs and those that underwent medium or high dehydration (~16 or ~30% loss of total body water). Dehydration increased HSP27 (1.45-1.65-fold) in the kidneys and lungs, and HSP40 (1.39-2.50-fold) in the liver, testes, and skeletal muscle. HSP60 decreased in response to dehydration (0.43-0.64 of control) in the kidneys and lungs. HSP70 increased in the liver, lungs, and testes (1.39-1.70-fold) during dehydration, but had a dynamic response in the kidneys (levels increased 1.57-fold with medium dehydration, but decreased to 0.56 of control during high dehydration). HSC70 increased in the liver and kidneys (1.20-1.36-fold), but decreased in skeletal muscle (0.27-0.55 of control) during dehydration. Lastly, HSP90 was reduced in the kidney, lung, and skeletal muscle (0.39-0.69 of control) in response to dehydration, but rose in the testes (1.30-fold). Overall, the results suggest a dynamic tissue-specific heat shock protein response to whole body dehydration in X. laevis.

KEYWORDS:

Chaperone; Cytoprotection; Dehydration; Stress response; Xenopus laevis

PMID:
28676984
PMCID:
PMC5741580
DOI:
10.1007/s12192-017-0822-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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