Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2017 Aug;19(8):51. doi: 10.1007/s11920-017-0797-3.

Eating Disorders and the Intestinal Microbiota: Mechanisms of Energy Homeostasis and Behavioral Influence.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
2
Department of Medicine, Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
4
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
5
Department of Nutrition, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. ian_carroll@med.unc.edu.
6
Department of Medicine, Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. ian_carroll@med.unc.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

We reviewed and evaluated recently published scientific studies that explored the role of the intestinal microbiota in eating disorders.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Studies have demonstrated that the intestinal microbiota is a contributing factor to both host energy homeostasis and behavior-two traits commonly disrupted in patients with eating disorders. To date, intestinal microbiota research in eating disorders has focused solely on anorexia nervosa (AN). Initial studies have reported an atypical intestinal microbial composition in patients with AN compared to healthy controls. However, the impact of these AN-associated microbial communities on host metabolism and behavior remains unknown. The intriguing pattern of findings in patients with AN encourages further investigation of the intestinal microbiota in eating disorders. Elucidating the specific role(s) of these microbial communities may yield novel ideas for augmenting current clinical therapies to promote weight gain, decrease gastrointestinal distress, and even reduce psychological symptomatology.

KEYWORDS:

Brain-gut-microbiota axis; Eating disorders; Intestinal microbiota; Metabolism

PMID:
28676966
PMCID:
PMC5881382
DOI:
10.1007/s11920-017-0797-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center