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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 Oct;65(10):2176-2181. doi: 10.1111/jgs.14991. Epub 2017 Jul 4.

Associations Between Self-Reported Physical Activity and Physical Performance Measures Over Time in Postmenopausal Women: The Women's Health Initiative.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
2
University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, Arizona.
3
Department of Health Promotion Sciences, University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, Tucson, Arizona.
4
School of Medicine, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada.
5
Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System and University of California San Diego, San Diego, California.
6
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California.
7
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona.
8
Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York.
9
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas.
10
Endocrine-Hypertension Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
11
Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
12
Stanford Prevention Research Center, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine prospective associations between changes in physical activity (PA) and changes in physical performance measures (PPMs) over 6 years in older women.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Forty clinical centers in the United States.

PARTICIPANTS:

Women aged 65 and older (mean age 69.8) enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Clinical Trials with gait speed, timed chair stand, grip strength, and self-reported recreational PA data assessed at baseline (1993-98) and follow-up Years 1, 3, and 6 (N = 5,092).

MEASUREMENTS:

Mixed-effects linear regression models were used to determine the association between time-varying PA and change in each PPM. Potential interactions between time-varying PA and age (<70, ≥70) were also tested.

RESULTS:

Significan, dose-response associations between PA and improvements in all PPMs were observed over the 6 years of follow-up after adjusting for important covariates. High PA groups (≥1,200 metabolic equivalent (MET)-min/wk) had stronger grip strength (0.48 kg greater; P < .01), more chair stands (0.35 more; P < .001), and faster gait speeds (0.06 m/s faster; P < .001) than sedentary women (<100 MET-min/wk). Higher PA levels were associated with a greater increase in chair stands over time in women aged 70 and older (P < .001) than in those younger than 70 (Pinteraction for age  = .01).

CONCLUSION:

In postmenopausal women, maintaining high PA levels over time is associated with better lower extremity function. These data support the view that regular PA plays an important role in maintaining functional status during aging in older women.

KEYWORDS:

epidemiology; mobility disability; physical activity; physical performance; postmenopausal women

PMID:
28675421
PMCID:
PMC5641229
DOI:
10.1111/jgs.14991
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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