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Urolithiasis. 2018 Jun;46(3):265-270. doi: 10.1007/s00240-017-0999-5. Epub 2017 Jul 3.

Vitamin B6 intake and the risk of incident kidney stones.

Author information

1
Division of Nephrology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, 00168, Rome, Italy. pietromanuel.ferraro@unicatt.it.
2
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.
3
Division of Nephrology and Transplantation, Maine Medical Center, Portland, USA.
4
Division of Nephrology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, 00168, Rome, Italy.
5
Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.

Abstract

Higher vitamin B6 intake might reduce urinary excretion of oxalate, one of the major determinants of risk for calcium oxalate kidney stones. Previous studies investigating the association between intake of vitamin B6 and risk of stones found conflicting results. We sought to investigate the association in three large prospective cohorts. We prospectively examined the association in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS; n = 42,919 men), Nurses' Health Study I (NHS I; n = 60,003 older women), and Nurses' Health Study II (NHS II; n = 90,629 younger women). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident stones across categories of total vitamin B6 intake (<3.0, 3.0-4.9, 5.0-9.9, 10.0-39.9, ≥40.0 mg/day) were generated with Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for potential confounders. During 3,316,846 person-years of follow-up, 6576 incident kidney stones were confirmed. In univariate and multivariate analyses, there was no association between intake of vitamin B6 and incident stones. The HR for stones in the highest category compared with the lowest was 1.05 (95% CI 0.85, 1.30; p value for trend = 0.61) for HPFS, 0.95 (95% CI 0.76, 1.18; p value for trend = 0.42) for NHS I, and 1.06 (95% CI 0.91, 1.24; p value for trend = 0.34) for NHS II. The pooled adjusted HR for the highest category compared with the lowest was 1.03 (95% CI 0.92, 1.15; p value for trend = 0.60). Intake of vitamin B6 is not associated with risk of incident kidney stones.

KEYWORDS:

Cohort studies; Nutrition; Urolithiasis; Vitamin B6

PMID:
28674784
PMCID:
PMC5752631
[Available on 2019-06-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s00240-017-0999-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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