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Circ Cardiovasc Imaging. 2017 Jul;10(7). pii: e005995. doi: 10.1161/CIRCIMAGING.116.005995.

Utility of 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Guidelines in HIV-Infected Adults With Carotid Atherosclerosis.

Author information

1
From the Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine (B.A.P.P., B.W., Y.M., D.L., S.H., S.C.K., P.H.), Positive Health Program (S.D.), San Francisco General Hospital, University of California; and Department of Medicine, San Francisco Veteran's Affairs Medical Center, University of California (R.S.).
2
From the Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine (B.A.P.P., B.W., Y.M., D.L., S.H., S.C.K., P.H.), Positive Health Program (S.D.), San Francisco General Hospital, University of California; and Department of Medicine, San Francisco Veteran's Affairs Medical Center, University of California (R.S.). Priscilla.hsue@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although HIV is associated with increased atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, it is unknown whether guidelines can identify HIV-infected adults who may benefit from statins. We compared the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and 2004 Adult Treatment Panel III recommendations in HIV-infected adults and evaluated associations with carotid artery intima-media thickness and plaque.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Carotid artery intima-media thickness was measured at baseline and 3 years later in 352 HIV-infected adults without clinical atherosclerotic CVD and not on statins. Plaque was defined as IMT >1.5 mm in any segment. At baseline, the median age was 43 (interquartile range, 39-49), 85% were men, 74% were on antiretroviral medication, and 50% had plaque. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines were more likely to recommend statins compared with the Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines, both overall (26% versus 14%; P<0.001), in those with plaque (32% versus 17%; P=0.0002), and in those without plaque (16% versus 7%; P=0.025). In multivariable analysis, older age, higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, pack per year of smoking, and history of opportunistic infection were associated with baseline plaque. Baseline IMT (hazard ratio, 1.18 per 10% increment; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.33; P=0.005) and plaque (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-4.08; P=0.037) were each associated with all-cause mortality, independent of traditional CVD risk factors.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines recommended statins to a greater number of HIV-infected adults compared with the Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines, both failed to recommend therapy in the majority of HIV-affected adults with carotid plaque. Baseline carotid atherosclerosis but not atherosclerotic CVD risk scores was an independent predictor of mortality. HIV-specific guidelines that include detection of subclinical atherosclerosis may help to identify HIV-infected adults who are at increased atherosclerotic CVD risk and may be considered for statins.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; adult; atherosclerosis; carotid artery diseases; carotid intima-media thickness

PMID:
28674084
PMCID:
PMC5516666
DOI:
10.1161/CIRCIMAGING.116.005995
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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