Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neurol Clin. 2017 Aug;35(3):409-434. doi: 10.1016/j.ncl.2017.03.001.

Estimating Concussion Incidence Using Sports Injury Surveillance Systems: Complexities and Potential Pitfalls.

Author information

1
Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Injury Prevention Research Center, University of North Carolina, Woollen 313, CB#8700, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8700, USA. Electronic address: zkerr@email.unc.edu.
2
Department of Neurological Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Medical Center North T-4224, Nashville, TN 37212, USA.
3
Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Injury Prevention Research Center, University of North Carolina, Fetzer 125, CB#8700, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8700, USA.
4
Datalys Center for Sports Injury Research and Prevention, 401 West Michigan Street, Suite 500, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.
5
Athletic Training Programs, School of Osteopathic Medicine, A.T. Still University, 5850 East Still Circle, Mesa, AZ 85206, USA.
6
Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Denver, Anschutz, Mail Stop B119, 13001 East 17th Place, Aurora, CO 80045, USA.
7
Department of Epidemiology, Injury Prevention Research Center, University of North Carolina, Suite 500, Bank of America Building, CB#7505, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7505, USA.

Abstract

Numerous sports injury surveillance systems exist with the capability of tracking concussion incidence data. It is important for the consumers of sport-related concussion data, be they researchers or the public, to have a comprehensive understanding of the strengths and limitations of sports injury surveillance systems. This article discusses issues of system design and analysis that affect the interpretation and understanding of sport-related concussion incidence data from sports injury surveillance systems. Such understanding will help inform the design of sports injury surveillance systems and research studies that aim to identify risk factors, develop prevention strategies, and evaluate prevention mechanisms.

KEYWORDS:

Concussion; High School Reporting Information Online; National Collegiate Athletic Association; Sports injury; Surveillance; Traumatic brain injury

PMID:
28673407
DOI:
10.1016/j.ncl.2017.03.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center