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Nat Neurosci. 2017 Aug;20(8):1162-1171. doi: 10.1038/nn.4597. Epub 2017 Jul 3.

Transcriptomic analysis of purified human cortical microglia reveals age-associated changes.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, Section Medical Physiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.
2
Department of Neurology, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Biology, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
4
Brazilian Aging Brain Study Group, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
5
Center for Studies of Cellular and Molecular Therapy (NAP-NETCEM-NUCEL), University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
6
Chemistry Institute, Department of Biochemistry, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
7
Neuroinflammation Disease Biology Unit, Lundbeck Research USA, Paramus, New Jersey, USA.
8
Department of Pathology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.

Abstract

Microglia are essential for CNS homeostasis and innate neuroimmune function, and play important roles in neurodegeneration and brain aging. Here we present gene expression profiles of purified microglia isolated at autopsy from the parietal cortex of 39 human subjects with intact cognition. Overall, genes expressed by human microglia were similar to those in mouse, including established microglial genes CX3CR1, P2RY12 and ITGAM (CD11B). However, a number of immune genes, not identified as part of the mouse microglial signature, were abundantly expressed in human microglia, including TLR, Fcγ and SIGLEC receptors, as well as TAL1 and IFI16, regulators of proliferation and cell cycle. Age-associated changes in human microglia were enriched for genes involved in cell adhesion, axonal guidance, cell surface receptor expression and actin (dis)assembly. Limited overlap was observed in microglial genes regulated during aging between mice and humans, indicating that human and mouse microglia age differently.

PMID:
28671693
DOI:
10.1038/nn.4597
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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