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J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;59(3):803-814. doi: 10.3233/JAD-161153.

Alcohol Intake and Cognitively Healthy Longevity in Community-Dwelling Adults: The Rancho Bernardo Study.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
2
Simmons College, Fenway, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.

Abstract

To better understand the association of alcohol intake with cognitively healthy longevity (CHL), we explored the association between amount and frequency of alcohol intake and CHL among 1,344 older community-dwelling adults. Alcohol intake was assessed by questionnaire in 1984-1987. Cognitive function was assessed in approximate four-year intervals between 1988 and 2009. Multinomial logistic regression, adjusting for multiple lifestyle and health factors, was used to examine the association between alcohol consumption and CHL (living to age 85 without cognitive impairment), survival to age 85 with cognitive impairment (MMSE score >1.5 standard deviations below expectation for age, sex, and education), or death before age 85. Most participants (88%) reported some current alcohol intake; 49% reported a moderate amount of alcohol intake, and 48% reported drinking near-daily. Relative to nondrinkers, moderate and heavy drinkers (up to 3 drinks/day for women and for men 65 years and older, up to 4 drinks/day for men under 65 years) had significantly higher adjusted odds of survival to age 85 without cognitive impairment (p's < 0.05). Near-daily drinkers had 2-3 fold higher adjusted odds of CHL versus living to at least age 85 with cognitive impairment (odds ratio (OR) = 2.06; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.21, 3.49) or death before 85 (OR = 3.24; 95% CI: 1.92, 5.46). Although excessive drinking has negative health consequences, these results suggest that regular, moderate drinking may play a role in cognitively healthy longevity.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol drinking; aging; cognitive impairment; cohort study; longevity

PMID:
28671111
PMCID:
PMC5939941
DOI:
10.3233/JAD-161153
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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