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J Surg Educ. 2017 Jun 29. pii: S1931-7204(17)30123-X. doi: 10.1016/j.jsurg.2017.06.004. [Epub ahead of print]

Self-Directed Interactive Video-Based Instruction Versus Instructor-Led Teaching for Myanmar House Surgeons: A Randomized, Noninferiority Trial.

Author information

1
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
2
University of Medicine 1, Yangon, Myanmar.
3
Johns Hopkins Biostatistics Center, Johns Hopkins University of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.
4
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address: ksteve14@jhmi.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare self-directed interactive video-based instruction (IVBI) with instructor-led teaching in the acquisition of basic surgical skills by House Surgeons at University of Medicine 1, Yangon.

DESIGN:

A prospective, 1:1 randomized controlled trial was conducted. Participants were randomized into 2 teaching arms: (1) self-directed IVBI or (2) instructor-led teaching. Self-directed IVBI participants were provided with a portable DVD player that could play, fast forward, rewind, and skip through skills modules. Participants in the instructor-led teaching group were taught in small groups by standardized instructors. Pretesting and posttesting of 1-handed knot tie, 2-handed knot tie, vertical mattress suture, and instrument tie was performed using the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS). Students randomized to self-directed IVBI completed an exit survey to assess satisfaction. Demographic data were collected of all participants.

SETTING:

University of Medicine 1, Yangon, Myanmar.

PARTICIPANTS:

Fifty participants were randomly selected from 78 eligible House Surgeons who were enrolled in their basic surgery rotation.

RESULTS:

Demographic characteristics and baseline skills were comparable in participants randomized to IVBI and instructor-led teaching. Mean OSATS score increased from pretest to posttest in both groups (p < 0.001). The mean posttest OSATS score of the IVBI group was 0.72 points below that of the instructor-led teaching group (90% CI: -3.8 to 5.2), with the 90% CI falling below the a priori noninferiority margin, satisfying criteria for noninferiority. More than 90% of students marked either "agree" or "strongly agree" to the following statements on the exit survey: further expansion of IVBI into other skills modules and integration of IVBI into training curriculum.

CONCLUSION:

IVBI is noninferior to instructor-led teaching of surgical skills based on OSATS scores. House Surgeons highly rated self-directed IVBI. Self-directed IVBI has the potential to significantly reduce the personnel required for skills teaching and may serve as a long-term learning adjunct in low-resource settings.

KEYWORDS:

Medical Knowledge; Patient Care; Practice-Based Learning and Improvement; global surgery; knot tying; medical education; self-directed interactive video-based instruction; suturing

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