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Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2017 Nov;36(11):2029-2040. doi: 10.1007/s10096-017-3029-1. Epub 2017 Jul 1.

Present status of laboratory diagnosis of human taeniosis/cysticercosis in Europe.

Author information

1
Department of Infectious Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, viale Regina Elena 299, 00161, Rome, Italy. mariaangeles.gomezmorales@iss.it.
2
Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Majadahonda, 28220, Madrid, Spain. tgarate@isciii.es.
3
Institute of Acute Neurology, Academic Teaching Hospital Feldkirch, Carinagasse 47, 6800, Feldkirch, Austria.
4
Department of Public Health and Surveillance, Scientific Institute of Public Health (WIV-ISP), Rue Juliette Wytsmanstraat 14, 1050, Brussels, Belgium.
5
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nationalestraat 155, 2000, Antwerp, Belgium.
6
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Virology, Parasitology and Immunology, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium.
7
Institute of Health and Society (IRSS), Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.
8
Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Straße 22, 81675, Munich, Germany.
9
Centre for Global Health, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Kirkeveien 166, 0450, Oslo, Norway.
10
Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Majadahonda, 28220, Madrid, Spain.
11
Department of Infectious Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, viale Regina Elena 299, 00161, Rome, Italy.
12
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food Safety, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
13
Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Straße 22, 81675, Munich, Germany. a.s.winkler@medisin.uio.no.
14
Centre for Global Health, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Kirkeveien 166, 0450, Oslo, Norway. a.s.winkler@medisin.uio.no.

Abstract

Human cysticercosis (CC) is a parasitic zoonosis caused by the larval stage (cyst) of the Taenia solium. Cysts can establish in the human central nervous system (neurocysticercosis, NCC) and other organs and tissues; they also develop in pigs, the natural intermediate host. Human taeniosis may be caused by T. solium, Taenia saginata and Taenia asiatica tapeworms; these infections are usually asymptomatic, but show a significant relevance as they perpetuate the parasites' life cycle, and, in the case of T. solium, they are the origin of (N)CC. In European Union (EU) member states and associated countries, the occurrence of autochthonous T. solium cases is debated, and imported cases have significantly increased lately; the status of T. asiatica has been never reported, whereas T. saginata is prevalent and causes an economic impact due to condemned carcasses. Based on their effects on the EU society, the specific diagnosis of these pathologies is relevant for their prevention and control. The aims of this study were to know the diagnostic tests used in European laboratories for human taeniosis/cysticercosis by means of a questionnaire, to determine potential gaps in their detection, and to obtain preliminary data on the number of diagnosed taeniosis/CC cases.

KEYWORDS:

Cysticercosis; Laboratory diagnosis; Neurocysticercosis; Taenia saginata; Taenia solium; Taeniosis

PMID:
28669015
PMCID:
PMC5653711
DOI:
10.1007/s10096-017-3029-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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