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Schizophr Bull. 2018 Apr 6;44(3):584-592. doi: 10.1093/schbul/sbw162.

Child Maltreatment and Clinical Outcome in Individuals at Ultra-High Risk for Psychosis in the EU-GEI High Risk Study.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Psychosis Research, Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, The Hague, The Netherlands.
3
Departments of Psychiatry and Preventive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai, NY.
4
Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK.
5
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK.
6
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
7
King's College London, King's Health Partners, Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK.
8
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
9
Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University and EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
10
Department of Public Mental Health, Trimbos Institute (Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction), Utrecht, The Netherlands.
11
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
12
Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University and Amsterdam Public Health research institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Background:

Child maltreatment has been associated with a wide range of mental disorders in adulthood. Whether child maltreatment is specifically associated with psychosis risk in individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis, or leads to a general vulnerability for overall psychopathology in the UHR stage remains unclear. The present study examines the association between child maltreatment and transition to psychosis and other mental disorders.

Methods:

The sample consisted of 259 UHR individuals from the EUropean network of national schizophrenia networks studying Gene-Environment Interactions (EU-GEI) study. Participants were followed-up for 2 years to assess clinical outcome. Clinical outcome was assessed at 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after baseline. Child maltreatment before the age of 17 years was assessed at baseline.

Results:

Our findings show that a history of emotional abuse was associated with an increased risk for transition to psychosis (OR = 3.78, 95% CI = 1.17 to 12.39, P = .027). Apart from psychosis, a history of physical abuse was associated with depressive disorder (OR = 4.92, 95% CI = 2.12 to 11.39, P = .001), post-traumatic stress disorder (OR = 2.06, 95% CI = 1.10 to 3.86, P = .023), panic disorder (OR = 2.00, 95% CI = 1.00 to 3.99, P = .048) and social phobia (OR = 2.47, 95% CI = 1.18 to 5.16, P = .016) at follow-up.

Conclusion:

Our findings suggest that in the UHR stage child maltreatment is a pluripotent risk factor for developing psychosis, depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), panic disorder, and social phobia in adulthood.

PMID:
28666366
PMCID:
PMC5890491
DOI:
10.1093/schbul/sbw162
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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