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Int J Drug Policy. 2017 Aug;46:90-98. doi: 10.1016/j.drugpo.2017.05.053. Epub 2017 Jun 27.

Prevalence of prescription opioid use disorder among chronic opioid therapy patients after health plan opioid dose and risk reduction initiatives.

Author information

1
Kaiser Permanente Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA. Electronic address: vonkorff.m@ghc.org.
2
Kaiser Permanente Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA.
3
Kaiser Permanente Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA; Department of Biostatistics, University of Washington, USA.
4
School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
5
Kaiser Permanente Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA; Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

No studies have assessed the comparative effectiveness of guideline-recommended interventions to reduce risk of prescription opioid use disorder among chronic opioid therapy (COT) patients. We compared the prevalence of prescription opioid use disorder among COT patients from intervention clinics that had implemented opioid dose and risk reduction initiatives for more than 4 years relative to control clinics that had not.

METHODS:

After a healthcare system in Washington State implemented interventions to reduce opioid dose and risks, we surveyed 1588 adult primary care COT patients to compare the prevalence of prescription opioid use disorder among COT patients from the intervention and control clinics. Intervention clinics managed COT patients at lower COT doses and with more consistent use of risk reduction practices. Control clinics cared for similar COT patients but prescribed higher opioid doses and used COT risk reduction practices inconsistently. Prescription opioid use disorder was assessed with the Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of prescription opioid use disorder was 21.5% (95% CI=18.9% to 24.4%) among COT patients in the intervention clinics and 23.9% (95% CI=20.5% to 27.6%) among COT patients in the control clinics. The adjusted relative risk of prescription opioid use disorder was 1.08 (95% CI=0.89, 1.32) among the control clinic patients relative to the intervention clinic patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

Long-term implementation of opioid dose and risk reduction initiatives was not associated with lower rates of prescription opioid use disorder among prevalent COT patients. Extreme caution should be exercised by clinicians considering COT for patients with chronic non-cancer pain until benefits of this treatment and attendant risks are clarified.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic pain; Drug abuse; Opioids; PRISM5; Practice change; Prescription opioid use disorder

PMID:
28666143
DOI:
10.1016/j.drugpo.2017.05.053
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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