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Eur Spine J. 2018 Feb;27(2):253-263. doi: 10.1007/s00586-017-5203-7. Epub 2017 Jun 29.

The influence of pregnancy on women with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

Author information

1
Department of Neurological Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, T-4224 Medical Center North, Nashville, TN, 37232-2380, USA. michael.dewan@vanderbilt.edu.
2
Department of Neurological Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, T-4224 Medical Center North, Nashville, TN, 37232-2380, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The study's aim was to address three fundamental questions related to pregnancy and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), and provide clinically applicable answers to spine specialists and general practitioners alike.

METHODS:

The authors performed a systematic literature review using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to identify articles published between 1980 and 2015 that described pregnancy-related characteristics and outcomes in AIS patients. The search was conducted using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines and evidence was classified according to the Oxford CEBM (Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine) appraisal tool.

RESULTS:

Twenty-two articles incorporating more than 3125 AIS patients were included. All studies concluded level 2b evidence or lower. Nulliparity rates were slightly higher among AIS patients, and more frequent infertility treatment was required. Pregnancy-related back pain was common, and while non-disabling, may have been more severe than in healthy women. Minor curve progression often occurred during pregnancy, though its permanence was questioned and significance unknown. Back pain and curve progression occurred independent of AIS treatment modality. With modern technology, anesthetic and obstetric complications in the perinatal period were not elevated in AIS mothers.

CONCLUSIONS:

Women with AIS experience slightly elevated rates of nulliparity, infertility treatment, prepartum back pain, and peripartum curve progression. However, most women are able to have children and are not at increased risk of pregnancy-related complications. Higher quality evidence is needed to better define these relationships and allow more guided counseling and treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis; Anesthesia; Back pain; Curve progression; Pregnancy

PMID:
28664223
DOI:
10.1007/s00586-017-5203-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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