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Lancet Neurol. 2017 Aug;16(8):648-660. doi: 10.1016/S1474-4422(17)30168-0. Epub 2017 Jun 26.

Music-based interventions in neurological rehabilitation.

Author information

1
Faculty of Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: ajsihv@utu.fi.
2
Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
3
Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland; CICERO Learning, University of Helsinki, Finland.
4
Institute of Music Physiology and Musicians' Medicine, University of Music and Drama Hannover, Hanover, Germany.
5
Department of Neurology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.

Abstract

During the past ten years, an increasing number of controlled studies have assessed the potential rehabilitative effects of music-based interventions, such as music listening, singing, or playing an instrument, in several neurological diseases. Although the number of studies and extent of available evidence is greatest in stroke and dementia, there is also evidence for the effects of music-based interventions on supporting cognition, motor function, or emotional wellbeing in people with Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, or multiple sclerosis. Music-based interventions can affect divergent functions such as motor performance, speech, or cognition in these patient groups. However, the psychological effects and neurobiological mechanisms underlying the effects of music interventions are likely to share common neural systems for reward, arousal, affect regulation, learning, and activity-driven plasticity. Although further controlled studies are needed to establish the efficacy of music in neurological recovery, music-based interventions are emerging as promising rehabilitation strategies.

PMID:
28663005
DOI:
10.1016/S1474-4422(17)30168-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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