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PLoS One. 2017 Jun 29;12(6):e0180251. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0180251. eCollection 2017.

Circulating tumor cells detected by lab-on-a-disc: Role in early diagnosis of gastric cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, Korea.
2
Department of Surgery, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan, Korea.
3
Department of Pathology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan, Korea.
4
Center for Soft and Living Matter, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Ulsan, Korea.
5
Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The use of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) as an early diagnostic biomarker and prognostic indicator after surgery or chemotherapy has been suggested for various cancers. This study aimed to evaluate CTCs in patients who underwent gastrectomy for gastric cancer and to explore their clinical usefulness in the early diagnosis of gastric cancer.

METHODS:

A total of 116 patients with gastric cancer who underwent gastrectomy and 31 healthy volunteers were prospectively included between 2014 and 2015. Peripheral blood samples were collected before gastrectomy, and CTCs were examined using a centrifugal microfluidic system with a new fluid-assisted separation technique.

RESULTS:

After creating a receiver operating characteristic curve to identify the discriminative CTC value needed differentiate patients with gastric cancer from healthy volunteers, sensitivity and specificity were nearly optimized at a CTC threshold of 2 per 7.5 mL of blood. Of the 102 persons with a CTC level ≥2 per 7.5 mL of blood, 99 (97.1%) had gastric cancer, and of the 45 persons with a CTC level <2 per 7.5 mL of blood, 28 (62.2%) were healthy controls. Accordingly, the sensitivity and specificity for the differentiation of patients with gastric cancer from healthy controls were 85.3% and 90.3%, respectively. However, the presence of CTCs was not associated with any clinicopathologic features such as staging, histologic type, or mucin phenotype.

CONCLUSION:

Although we could not prove the clinical feasibility of CTCs for gastric cancer staging, our results suggest a potential role of CTCs as an early diagnostic biomarker of gastric cancer.

PMID:
28662130
PMCID:
PMC5491173
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0180251
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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