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Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2017 Sep;25(5):406-410. doi: 10.1002/erv.2526. Epub 2017 Jun 29.

Risk of Urolithiasis in Anorexia Nervosa: A Population-Based Cohort Study Using the Health Improvement Network.

Author information

1
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
2
Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.
3
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Abstract

This population-based retrospective cohort study sought to determine if anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with a higher risk of urolithiasis. Nine thousand three hundred two females with AN were compared to 92 959 randomly selected age-matched and practice-matched females. Cox regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for urolithiasis and evaluate effect modification by age. Twenty-three participants with AN (0.25%) developed urolithiasis compared with 154 unexposed participants (0.17%) over a median of 4 years of observation. The risk of urolithiasis varied significantly with age (interaction p = 0.02). AN was associated with a more than threefold higher risk of urolithiasis in females ≤25 years of age (HR 3.49, 95% CI: 1.56-7.81; p = 0.002), but not in females over 25 years (HR 1.18, 95% CI: 0.69-2.02; p = 0.54). The distribution of diagnosis codes for urolithiasis differed between groups (p = 0.04), with a higher proportion of codes for uric acid urolithiasis in the AN (16.2%) versus unexposed group (5.0%).

KEYWORDS:

anorexia nervosa; eating disorders; kidney stone; nephrolithiasis; urolithiasis

PMID:
28660717
DOI:
10.1002/erv.2526
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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