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Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2017 Nov;90(8):789-797. doi: 10.1007/s00420-017-1242-y. Epub 2017 Jun 28.

Associations between organizational injustice and work ability, self-reported disability days, and medical consultations: cross-sectional findings from employees with prior sickness absence payments.

Author information

1
Institute for Social Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23562, Lübeck, Germany. katja.spanier@uksh.de.
2
Institute for Social Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23562, Lübeck, Germany.
3
Institute of Medical Sociology and Rehabilitation Science, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim of the study was to identify associations between organizational injustice and work ability, disability days, and consultations with general practitioners.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional data of persons previously receiving sickness absence benefits were used for analyses. Organizational injustice was assessed using a German version of the "organizational justice questionnaire". Dependent variables were the Work Ability Index, self-reported disability days, and consultations with general practitioners. Associations were adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, behavioral health risks, neuroticism, effort-reward imbalance, and overcommitment.

RESULTS:

The analysis included 2983 employed persons (54.1% women, mean age: 47.9 years). High organizational injustice was associated with poor work ability (OR = 2.04, 95% CI 1.55-2.69). There were also slight associations with frequent self-reported disability days (OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.06-1.68). The dependent variables were also associated with the effort-reward ratio and overcommitment.

CONCLUSION:

Organizational injustice is associated with work ability, self-reported disability days, and health-care utilization. Results support the notion of a complementary role of the models of organizational justice and effort-reward imbalance.

KEYWORDS:

Cohort study; Effort–reward imbalance; Organizational justice; Sickness absence benefits; Work ability

PMID:
28660322
DOI:
10.1007/s00420-017-1242-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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