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Open Biol. 2017 Jun;7(6). pii: 170081. doi: 10.1098/rsob.170081.

Cell signalling pathway regulation by RanBPM: molecular insights and disease implications.

Author information

1
Robarts Research Institute, Department of Biochemistry, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street North, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 5B7.
2
Robarts Research Institute, Department of Biochemistry, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street North, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 5B7 cschild-poulter@robarts.ca.

Abstract

RanBPM (Ran-binding protein M, also called RanBP9) is an evolutionarily conserved, ubiquitous protein which localizes to both nucleus and cytoplasm. RanBPM has been implicated in the regulation of a number of signalling pathways to regulate several cellular processes such as apoptosis, cell adhesion, migration as well as transcription, and plays a critical role during development. In addition, RanBPM has been shown to regulate pathways implicated in cancer and Alzheimer's disease, implying that RanBPM has important functions in both normal and pathological development. While its functions in these processes are still poorly understood, RanBPM has been identified as a component of a large complex, termed the CTLH (C-terminal to LisH) complex. The yeast homologue of this complex functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets enzymes of the gluconeogenesis pathway. While the CTLH complex E3 ubiquitin ligase activity and substrates still remain to be characterized, the high level of conservation between the complexes in yeast and mammals infers that the CTLH complex could also serve to promote the degradation of specific substrates through ubiquitination, therefore suggesting the possibility that RanBPM's various functions may be mediated through the activity of the CTLH complex.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer disease; CTLH complex; Gid; RanBPM; cancer

PMID:
28659384
PMCID:
PMC5493780
DOI:
10.1098/rsob.170081
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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