Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Acad Med. 2017 Jul;92(7):1022-1027. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000001476.

Enhancing Student Empathetic Engagement, History-Taking, and Communication Skills During Electronic Medical Record Use in Patient Care.

Author information

1
A.A. LoSasso is director, Pediatric Undergraduate Medical Education, and associate professor of clinical pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.C.E. Lamberton is a first-year resident, Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.M. Sammon is assistant professor of clinical pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.K.T. Berg is director, University Clinical Skills and Simulation Center, medical director, Standardized Patient Program, and professor of medicine, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.J.W. Caruso is senior associate dean, Graduate Medical Education and Affiliations, and professor of medicine, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.J. Cass is senior technical analyst, Center for Research in Medical Education and Health Care, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.M. Hojat is research professor of psychiatry and human behavior, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, and director, Jefferson Longitudinal Study of Medical Education, Center for Research in Medical Education and Health Care, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To examine whether an intervention on proper use of electronic medical records (EMRs) in patient care could help improve medical students' empathic engagement, and to test the hypothesis that the training would reduce communication hurdles in clinical encounters.

METHOD:

Seventy third-year medical students from the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University were randomly divided into intervention and control groups during their six-week pediatric clerkship in 2012-2013. The intervention group received a one-hour training session on EMR-specific communication skills, including discussion of EMR use, the SALTED mnemonic and technique (Set-up, Ask, Listen, Type, Exceptions, Documentation), and role-plays. Both groups completed the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) at the clerkship's start and end. At clerkship's end, faculty and standardized patients (SPs) rated students' empathic engagement in SP encounters, using the Jefferson Scale of Patient Perceptions of Physician Empathy (JSPPPE), and their history-taking and communication skills.

RESULTS:

Faculty mean ratings on the JSPPPE, history-taking skills, and communication skills were significantly higher for the intervention group than the control group. SP mean ratings on history-taking skills were significantly higher for the intervention group than the control group. Both groups' JSE mean scores increased pretest to posttest, but the changes were not significant. The intervention group's posttest JSE mean score was higher than the control group's, but the difference was not significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings suggest that a simple intervention providing specialized training in EMR-specific communication can improve medical students' empathic engagement in patient care, history-taking skills, and communication skills.

PMID:
28657557
DOI:
10.1097/ACM.0000000000001476
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center