Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2017 Jun;31 Suppl 4:12-30. doi: 10.1111/jdv.14316.

Occupational skin diseases: actual state analysis of patient management pathways in 28 European countries.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany.
2
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
3
Department of Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology, National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway.
4
National Center of Occupational Diseases Coronel Institute AMC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
5
Expertise Center of Occupational Dermato-Allergology VUmc, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
6
Department of Dermatology, University Allergy Centre, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
7
Unit of Occupational and Environmental Diseases, Hôtel-Dieu Hospital Group, APHP, EA 4064 Environmental and Public Health Laboratory, Paris, France.
8
Descartes University, Paris, France.
9
Unit of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
10
Department of Dermatology, South Infirmary Victoria University Hospital, Cork, Ireland.
11
Croatian Institute for Health Protection and Safety at Work, Zagreb, Croatia.
12
University of Belgrade Faculty of Medicine-Serbian Institute of Occupational Health, Belgrade, Serbia.
13
Department of Occupational Medicine, Charles University Faculty of Medicine, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic.
14
Federal Agency for Occupational Risks (FEDRIS), Brussels, Belgium.
15
The Norwegian Labour Inspection Authority, Oslo, Norway.
16
Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Tokuda Hospital Sofia and Section of Dermatovenereology, Trakia University, Stara Zagora, Bulgaria.
17
Department of Dermatology, University Medical Centre, Maribor, Slovenia.
18
Department of Dermatology, Faculty Hospital, Charles University Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
19
Hospital del Mar. Parc de Salut Mar, Universitat Autonoma, Barcelona, Spain.
20
Department of Dermatology, University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
21
Department of Dermato-Allergology, National Allergy Research Center, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
22
Department of Dermatology, Lower-Saxonian Institute of Occupational Dermatology (NIB), University of Osnabrueck, Osnabrück, Germany.
23
Dermatology Unit, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland.
24
Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Schuman Hospitals, Kirchberg Hospital, Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
25
Dermatological Specialist Consultation of the Medical Department at the National Labour Office, Budapest, Hungary.
26
Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, The Jan Kochanowski University, Kielce, Poland.
27
Department of Public Health, Occupational Medicine, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy.
28
Department of Dermatology and Venereology, University Hospital Center Zagreb, School of Medicine University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
29
Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb, Croatia.
30
Unit of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, SLSO, Stockholm, Sweden.
31
Institute of Occupational Health of R. Macedonia, WHO Collaborating Center for Occupational Health, Skopje, Macedonia.
32
University of Malta Medical School, Msida, Malta.
33
IMIM-Instituto Hospital del Mar de Investigaciones Médicas, CiSAL-Centro de Investigación en Salud Laboral, Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain.
34
SUVA, Luzern, Switzerland.
35
Clinic of Dermatovenereology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia.
36
2nd Clinic of Dermatology, "Colentina" Clinical Hospital, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania.
37
Department of Dermatology, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria.
38
Department of Dermatology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
39
Department of Dermatology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
40
Department of Experimental Dermatology and Cosmetology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland.
41
Department of Dermatology, F.D. Roosevelt Hospital, Banská Bystrica, Slovakia.
42
Department of Skin and Venereal Diseases, Hospital of LUHS, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences (LUHS), Kaunas, Lithuania.
43
Institute for Interdisciplinary Dermatological Prevention and Rehabilitation at the University of Osnabrück (iDerm), Berlin, Germany.
44
Department of Dermatology, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds, England.
45
Department of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Work-related skin diseases (WSD) are caused or worsened by a professional activity. Occupational skin diseases (OSD) need to fulfil additional legal criteria which differ from country to country. OSD range amongst the five most frequently notified occupational diseases (musculoskeletal diseases, neurologic diseases, lung diseases, diseases of the sensory organs, skin diseases) in Europe.

OBJECTIVE:

To retrieve information and compare the current state of national frameworks and pathways to manage patients with occupational skin disease with regard to prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation in different European countries.

METHODS:

A questionnaire-based survey of the current situation regarding OSD patient management pathways was carried out with experts on occupational dermatology and/or occupational medicine from 28 European countries contributing to the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action TD 1206 (StanDerm) (www.standerm.eu).

RESULTS:

Besides a national health service or a statutory health insurance, most European member states implemented a second insurance scheme specifically geared at occupational diseases [insurance against occupational risks (synonyms: insurance against work accidents and occupational injuries; statutory social accident insurance)]. Legal standards for the assessment of occupationally triggered diseases with a genetic background differ between different countries, however, in most European member states recognition as OSD is possible. In one-third of the countries UV light-induced tumours can be recognized as OSD under specific conditions.

CONCLUSION:

OSD definitions vary between European countries and are not directly comparable, which hampers comparisons between statistics collected in different countries. Awareness of this fact and further efforts for standardization are necessary.

PMID:
28656731
DOI:
10.1111/jdv.14316
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for Norwegian BIBSYS system
Loading ...
Support Center