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Contact Dermatitis. 2017 Dec;77(6):360-366. doi: 10.1111/cod.12827. Epub 2017 Jun 27.

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by (meth)acrylates in long-lasting nail polish - are we facing a new epidemic in the beauty industry?

Author information

1
Dermatology Department, Toledo Hospital Complex, 45071, Toledo, Spain.
2
Dermatology Department, University Hospital of Guadalajara, 19002 Guadalajara, Spain.
3
Medicine and Medical Specialties Department, Alcalá de Henares University, 28801, Alcalá de Henares, Spain.
4
Dermatology Department, Morales Meseguer Hospital, 30008, Murcia, Spain.
5
Dermatology Department, Alicante General Hospital, 03010, Alicante, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) caused by (meth)acrylates has been described both in occupational and in non-occupational settings.

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the clinical patterns, the most frequent allergens and the prognosis in patients sensitized to (meth)acrylates in long-lasting nail polish.

METHODS:

The files of patients with ACD caused by (meth)acrylates in long-lasting nail polish diagnosed between January 2013 and June 2016 in four dermatology departments in Spain were reviewed. Patients were followed up by telephone interview.

RESULTS:

Overall, 2353 patients were patch tested. Forty-three (1.82%) were diagnosed with ACD caused by (meth)acrylates in long-lasting nail polish during that period; all were female, and all had hand dermatitis. Patients were mostly less than 40 years old (72.1%), non-atopic (95.4%) and had an occupational cause of their dermatitis (93%), which developed ∼10.1 months after they had started to use this technique. The most frequent positive allergens were: 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and tetrahydrofurfuryl methacrylate. Eight of the 22 interviewed patients were able to improve their working technique and used 4H® protective material (fingerstalls/gloves).

CONCLUSIONS:

Long-lasting nail polishes have become widespread, and it is a matter of concern that we may be facing a new epidemic of ACD caused by these. Policies regulating their use are urgently needed.

KEYWORDS:

acrylates; acrylic nails; allergic contact dermatitis; methacrylates; nail polish; occupational

PMID:
28656588
DOI:
10.1111/cod.12827
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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