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Sci Rep. 2017 Jun 27;7(1):4264. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-04388-z.

Contribution of plasma membrane lipid domains to red blood cell (re)shaping.

Author information

1
FACM Unit, Louvain Drug Research Institute & Université catholique de Louvain, 1200, Brussels, Belgium.
2
CELL Unit, de Duve Institute & Université catholique de Louvain, 1200, Brussels, Belgium.
3
PEDI Unit, Institut de Recherche expérimentale et clinique & Université catholique de Louvain, 1200, Brussels, Belgium.
4
CEMO Unit, Institute of Neuroscience & Université catholique de Louvain, 1200, Brussels, Belgium.
5
CELL Unit, de Duve Institute & Université catholique de Louvain, 1200, Brussels, Belgium. donatienne.tyteca@uclouvain.be.

Abstract

Although lipid domains have been evidenced in several living cell plasma membranes, their roles remain largely unclear. We here investigated whether they could contribute to function-associated cell (re)shaping. To address this question, we used erythrocytes as cellular model since they (i) exhibit a specific biconcave shape, allowing for reversible deformation in blood circulation, which is lost by membrane vesiculation upon aging; and (ii) display at their outer plasma membrane leaflet two types of submicrometric domains differently enriched in cholesterol and sphingomyelin. We here reveal the specific association of cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched domains with distinct curvature areas of the erythrocyte biconcave membrane. Upon erythrocyte deformation, cholesterol-enriched domains gathered in high curvature areas. In contrast, sphingomyelin-enriched domains increased in abundance upon calcium efflux during shape restoration. Upon erythrocyte storage at 4 °C (to mimick aging), lipid domains appeared as specific vesiculation sites. Altogether, our data indicate that lipid domains could contribute to erythrocyte function-associated (re)shaping.

PMID:
28655935
PMCID:
PMC5487352
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-04388-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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