Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2017 Jun 26;7(1):4236. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-03857-9.

Network model predicts that CatSper is the main Ca2+ channel in the regulation of sea urchin sperm motility.

Author information

1
Computational Genomics Division, National Institute of Genomic Medicine (INMEGEN), 14610, Mexico City, Mexico. jespinal@inmegen.gob.mx.
2
Centro de Ciencias de la Complejidad, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City, 04510, Mexico. jespinal@inmegen.gob.mx.
3
Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos, 62210, Mexico. jespinal@inmegen.gob.mx.
4
Centro de Ciencias de la Complejidad, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City, 04510, Mexico.
5
Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos, 62210, Mexico.
6
Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos, 62210, Mexico.
7
Centro de Ciencias de la Complejidad, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City, 04510, Mexico. mekler@fis.unam.mx.
8
Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos, 62210, Mexico. mekler@fis.unam.mx.

Abstract

Spermatozoa sea urchin swimming behaviour is regulated by small peptides from the egg outer envelope. Speract, such a peptide, after binding to its receptor in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sperm flagella, triggers a signaling pathway that culminates with a train of intracellular calcium oscillations, correlated with changes in sperm swimming pattern. This pathway has been widely studied but not fully characterized. Recent work on Arbacia punctulata sea urchin spermatozoa has documented the presence of the Ca2+ CatSper channel in their flagella and its involvement in chemotaxis. However, if other calcium channels participate in chemotaxis remains unclear. Here, based on an experimentally-backed logical network model, we conclude that CatSper is fundamental in the S. purpuratus speract-activated sea urchin sperm signaling cascade, although other Ca2+ channels could still be relevant. We also present for the first time experimental corroboration of its active presence in S. purpuratus sperm flagella. We argue, prompted by in silico knock-out calculations, that CatSper is the main generator of calcium oscillations in the signaling pathway and that other calcium channels, if present, have a complementary role. The approach adopted here allows us to unveil processes, which are hard to detect exclusively by experimental procedures.

PMID:
28652586
PMCID:
PMC5484689
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-03857-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center