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Tumour Biol. 2017 Jun;39(6):1010428317703984. doi: 10.1177/1010428317703984.

Mir-30d suppresses cell proliferation of colon cancer cells by inhibiting cell autophagy and promoting cell apoptosis.

Author information

1
1 Department of Colorectal Surgery, Liaoning Cancer Hospital & Institute, Cancer Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, P.R. China.
2
2 Department of Internal Medicine, Liaoning Cancer Hospital & Institute, Cancer Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, P.R. China.

Abstract

MiR-30 family plays an important role in the tumorigenesis of human cancers. The aim of the study is to investigate the role of miR-30d in human colon cancer cell lines and explore the molecular mechanism in the proliferation of colon cancer cells. The expression of miR-30d was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction assay in colon cancer cell lines (HCT15, HCT116, HT-29, DLD-1, and SW480) and the results demonstrated that miR-30d level was significantly decreased in human colon cancer cell lines, compared with normal colon epithelial cell line. Transfection with miR-30d mimics inhibited cell proliferation, and transfection with miR-30d inhibitors significantly promoted cell viability of colon cancer cells. Furthermore, TargetScan analysis predicted that miR-30d interacted with messenger RNA on its 3' untranslated region of ATG5, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and Beclin1 to negatively regulate cell autophagy in colon cancer cells. Moreover, transfection with miR-30d induced cell arrest at G2/M phase of HT-29 cells. Overexpression of miR-30d mimics inhibited cell viability probably due to the inhibition of cell autophagy and promotion of cell apoptosis. Thus, MiR-30d inhibited cell autophagy by directly targeting messenger RNA of ATG5, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and Beclin1 and promoted cell apoptosis of human colon cancer cells. It is helpful to clarify the function of miR-30d in tumorigenesis of human cancers.

KEYWORDS:

MiR-30d; apoptosis; autophagy; colon cancer

PMID:
28651493
DOI:
10.1177/1010428317703984
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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