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Nurse Educ Pract. 2017 Sep;26:12-20. doi: 10.1016/j.nepr.2017.06.007. Epub 2017 Jun 17.

Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes and preparedness toward caring for dying persons - A longitudinal study.

Author information

1
The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Box 457, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden; Angered Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: ingela.henoch@gu.se.
2
The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Box 457, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Department of Health Sciences, SE-831 25 Östersund, Sweden.
3
University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences, Box 408, SE-541 28 Skövde, Sweden.
4
The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Box 457, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden; Angered Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
5
Sophiahemmet University, Box 5605, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Box 12230, SE-102 26 Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Tomtebodavägen 18 A, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta Hospital, Palliative Research Centre, Box 11189, SE-100 61 Stockholm, Sweden.
7
University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences, Box 408, SE-541 28 Skövde, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Nursing, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Nursing education needs to prepare students for care of dying patients. The aim of this study was to describe the development of nursing students' attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their perceived preparedness to perform end-of-life care. A longitudinal study was performed with 117 nursing students at six universities in Sweden. The students completed the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) questionnaire at the beginning of first and second year, and at the end of third year of education. After education, the students completed questions about how prepared they felt by to perform end-of-life care. The total FATCOD increased from 126 to 132 during education. Five weeks' theoretical palliative care education significantly predicted positive changes in attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Students with five weeks' theoretical palliative care training felt more prepared and supported by the education to care for a dying patient than students with shorter education. A minority felt prepared to take care of a dead body or meet relatives.

KEYWORDS:

Attitudes; FATCOD; Longitudinal; Nurse education; Palliative care education

PMID:
28648955
DOI:
10.1016/j.nepr.2017.06.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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