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Stem Cell Reports. 2017 Jul 11;9(1):397-407. doi: 10.1016/j.stemcr.2017.05.026. Epub 2017 Jun 22.

Genome-wide, Single-Cell DNA Methylomics Reveals Increased Non-CpG Methylation during Human Oocyte Maturation.

Author information

1
Department of OBGYN, University of Washington School of Medicine, 1959 North East Pacific Street, Box 356460, Seattle, WA 98195-6460, USA. Electronic address: by26@uw.edu.
2
Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1301 Morris Park Avenue, Price 468, Bronx, New York, NY 10461, USA.
3
Institute of Plant Biology, University of Zurich, 8008 Zurich, Switzerland.
4
Reprogenetics LLC, Livingston, NJ 07039, USA.
5
Sher Institutes for Reproductive Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA.
6
Departments of Medicine and Genome Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.
7
Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1301 Morris Park Avenue, Price 468, Bronx, New York, NY 10461, USA. Electronic address: jan.vijg@einstein.yu.edu.

Abstract

The establishment of DNA methylation patterns in oocytes is a highly dynamic process marking gene-regulatory events during fertilization, embryonic development, and adulthood. However, after epigenetic reprogramming in primordial germ cells, how and when DNA methylation is re-established in developing human oocytes remains to be characterized. Here, using single-cell whole-genome bisulfite sequencing, we describe DNA methylation patterns in three different maturation stages of human oocytes. We found that while broad-scale patterns of CpG methylation have been largely established by the immature germinal vesicle stage, localized changes continue into later development. Non-CpG methylation, on the other hand, undergoes a large-scale, generalized remodeling through the final stage of maturation, with the net overall result being the accumulation of methylation as oocytes mature. The role of the genome-wide, non-CpG methylation remodeling in the final stage of oocyte maturation deserves further investigation.

KEYWORDS:

DNA methylome; epigenome; human oocyte; in vitro maturation; non-CpG methylation; oocyte maturation; single cell

PMID:
28648898
PMCID:
PMC5511109
DOI:
10.1016/j.stemcr.2017.05.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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