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Trends Parasitol. 2017 Oct;33(10):813-825. doi: 10.1016/j.pt.2017.05.013. Epub 2017 Jun 22.

Zoonotic Parasites of Sheltered and Stray Dogs in the Era of the Global Economic and Political Crisis.

Author information

1
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari, Valenzano 70010, Italy. Electronic address: domenico.otranto@uniba.it.
2
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Bari, Valenzano 70010, Italy; Department of Immunology, Aggeu Magalhães Institute, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz), Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil.
3
Department of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine of Cluj-Napoca, Cluj-Napoca 400372, Romania.
4
Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
5
Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA.
6
Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel.

Abstract

Sheltered and stray dogs, exposed to zoonotic parasites, including protozoa, helminths, and arthropods, may represent a major threat to public health. Resources for addressing health problems in these animals are not on the priority list of veterinary and public health authorities. Thus, dogs continue to represent an important reservoir for zoonotic parasites. In this article, we review the importance of sheltered and stray dogs as reservoirs of zoonotic parasites in different parts of the world, especially in the context of the current global political and economic crisis.

KEYWORDS:

economic crisis; poverty; sheltered dogs; stray dogs; zoonotic parasites

PMID:
28648798
DOI:
10.1016/j.pt.2017.05.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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