Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Environ Sci (China). 2017 Jul;57:238-248. doi: 10.1016/j.jes.2016.11.023. Epub 2017 Feb 21.

On-board measurement of particle numbers and their size distribution from a light-duty diesel vehicle: Influences of VSP and altitude.

Author information

1
National Laboratory of Automotive Performance & Emission Test, Beijing Institute of Technology, 100081 Beijing, China; Collaborative Innovation Center of Electrical Vehicles in Beijing, 100081 Beijing, China; Beijing Municipal Environmental Protection Bureau, Beijing 100048, China. Electronic address: john_liujia@sina.com.
2
National Laboratory of Automotive Performance & Emission Test, Beijing Institute of Technology, 100081 Beijing, China; Collaborative Innovation Center of Electrical Vehicles in Beijing, 100081 Beijing, China.
3
National Laboratory of Automotive Performance & Emission Test, Beijing Institute of Technology, 100081 Beijing, China; Collaborative Innovation Center of Electrical Vehicles in Beijing, 100081 Beijing, China. Electronic address: xin.wang@bit.edu.cn.
4
National Laboratory of Automotive Performance & Emission Test, Beijing Institute of Technology, 100081 Beijing, China; Collaborative Innovation Center of Electrical Vehicles in Beijing, 100081 Beijing, China; Energy Foundation China, Beijing 10004, China.
5
School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, 100081 Beijing, China.

Abstract

In this study, the particle size-resolved distribution from a China-3 certificated light-duty diesel vehicle was measured by using a portable emission measurement system (PEMS). In order to examine the influences of vehicle specific power (VSP) and high-altitude operation, measurements were conducted at 8 constant speeds, which ranged from 10 to 80km/hr at 10km/hr intervals, and two different high altitudes, namely 2200 and 3200m. The results demonstrated that the numbers of particles in all size ranges decreased significantly as VSP increased when the test vehicle was running at lower speeds (<20km/hr), while at a moderate speed (between 30 and 60km/hr), the particle number was statistically insensitive to increase VSP. Under high-speed cruising conditions, the numbers of ultrafine particles and PM2.5 were insensitive to changes in VSP, but the numbers of nanoparticles and PM10 surged considerably. An increase in the operational altitude of the test vehicle resulted in increased particle number emissions at low and high driving speeds; however, particle numbers obtained at moderate speeds decreased as altitude rose. When the test vehicle was running at moderate speeds, particle numbers measured at the two altitudes were very close, except for comparatively higher number concentrations of nanoparticles measured at 2200m.

KEYWORDS:

Diesel; High altitude; On-board measurement; Particle number; Size distribution; VSP

PMID:
28647244
DOI:
10.1016/j.jes.2016.11.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center