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J Infect. 2017 Jun;74 Suppl 1:S34-S40. doi: 10.1016/S0163-4453(17)30189-5.

The controversial role of breast milk in GBS late-onset disease.

Author information

1
Infectious Diseases Unit, The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Parkville, Australia; Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia; Infectious Diseases & Microbiology Research Group, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Australia.
2
Infectious Diseases Unit, The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Parkville, Australia; Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia; Infectious Diseases & Microbiology Research Group, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Australia. Electronic address: nigel.curtis@rch.org.au.

Abstract

Group B streptococcus (GBS) is one of the most common causes of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. Intra-partum antibiotic prophylaxis does not play a significant role in reducing the risk of GBS late-onset disease. One of the proposed mechanisms for GBS late-onset disease is infection through contaminated breast milk. Infants in whom breast milk is thought to be the source for GBS late-onset disease are more heavily colonised and reports suggest they have a higher recurrence rate compared to infants with other potential sources. There is no consensus whether the breast milk of mothers of infants with GBS late-onset disease, especially those with recurrent episodes, should be tested for GBS. In addition, recommendations differ on whether breast-feeding should be interrupted or breast milk pasteurised, or whether the mother and infant should be treated for colonisation. In this review we discuss these different approaches.

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotics; Colonisation; Infant; Late-onset sepsis; Streptococcus agalactiae

PMID:
28646960
DOI:
10.1016/S0163-4453(17)30189-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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