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Altern Ther Health Med. 2017 Jul;23(4):56-61.

Integrative Treatment of Chronic Abdominal Bloating and Pain Associated With Overgrowth of Small Intestinal Bacteria: A Case Report.

Abstract

Context • Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is commonly defined as an increased number of bacteria and/or an abnormal type of bacteria in the small intestine. Conventional treatment for SIBO is typically focused on antibiotics to eradicate the bacterial overgrowth. Numerous studies have demonstrated the antimicrobial activity of herbs, and a diet low in fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) has been shown to enhance antibiotic therapy. Objective • The current case study intended to evaluate the benefits of an alternative, multifaceted approach-including botanical and homeopathic therapies in conjunction with a low-FODMAP diet-in the treatment of SIBO and its associated symptoms. Design • The research team performed a case study. Setting • The study was conducted at SCNM Medical Center (Tempe, AZ, USA). Participant • The participant was a female patient at the SCNM Medical Center with chronic, daily, severe abdominal bloating and pain that particularly worsened after meals and by the end of the day. The patient also had a significant history of chronic constipation that had begun approximately 10 y prior to her experiencing the daily abdominal pain. Intervention • Based on a lactulose breath test for hydrogen and methane, the research team diagnosed the patient with a case of mild SIBO. The treatment approach was multifaceted, involving a low-FODMAP diet, antimicrobial botanical therapy, and homeopathic medicine. Results • The patient's abdominal pain and bloating resolved with the treatment of the SIBO, although her underlying constipation, which was likely associated with other factors, remained. Conclusions • This case study supports an alternative, multifaceted approach to the treatment of SIBO and commonly associated symptoms.

PMID:
28646815
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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