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Psychiatry Res. 2017 Oct;256:219-224. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.06.066. Epub 2017 Jun 19.

Higher cardio-respiratory fitness is associated with increased mental and physical quality of life in people with bipolar disorder: A controlled pilot study.

Author information

1
KU Leuven Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Tervuursevest 101, 3001 Leuven, Belgium; KU Leuven, University Psychiatric Center KU Leuven, Leuvensesteenweg 517, 3070 Kortenberg, Belgium. Electronic address: davy.vancampfort@kuleuven.be.
2
KU Leuven Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Tervuursevest 101, 3001 Leuven, Belgium.
3
KU Leuven, University Psychiatric Center KU Leuven, Leuvensesteenweg 517, 3070 Kortenberg, Belgium.
4
School of Psychiatry, UNSW Australia, The Black Dog Institute, University of New South Wales, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia.
5
Physiotherapy Department, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Denmark Hill, London, UK; Health Service and Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, De Crespigny Park, London, UK.
6
School of Health Sciences, Division of Psychology & Mental Health, University of Manchester, UK; NICM, School of Science and Health, University of Western Sydney, Australia.
7
Unilasalle, Canoas, Brazil; Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate whether cardiorespiratory fitness among outpatients with bipolar disorder is associated with health related quality of life (HRQL) and explore differences versus healthy controls. Outpatients with bipolar disorder and healthy controls matched for age, sex and body mass index completed the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, the Positive-and-Negative-Affect-Schedule (PANAS), a maximal cardiorespiratory fitness test, and wore a Sensewear Armband to measure physical activity and sedentary behavior for eight days. Unpaired t-tests, Pearson correlations and backward regression analyses were performed. Outpatients with bipolar disorder (n = 20; 14♀; 47.9 ± 7.9 years) had a significantly lower physical and mental HRQL than healthy controls (n = 20; 14♀; 47.8 ± 7.6 years), a lower maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) and were more sedentary. While no significant correlates were found for HRQL in controls, higher VO2max values and lower PANAS negative affect scores predicted better physical and mental HRQL in people with bipolar disorder. The final regression model explained 68% and 58% of the variability in physical and mental HRQL respectively. Cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with mental and physical HRQL among people with bipolar disorder. The current study offers novel targets for scientific investigation and clinical interventions to increase HRQL in people with bipolar disorder.

KEYWORDS:

Bipolar disorder; Fitness; Physical activity; Quality of life

PMID:
28646785
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2017.06.066
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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