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Int J Food Microbiol. 2017 Sep 18;257:67-74. doi: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2017.06.013. Epub 2017 Jun 16.

β-galactosidase from Aspergillus lacticoffeatus: A promising biocatalyst for the synthesis of novel prebiotics.

Author information

1
CEB-Centre of Biological Engineering, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal.
2
CEB-Centre of Biological Engineering, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal. Electronic address: sarasilverio@deb.uminho.pt.

Abstract

β-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23) are interesting enzymes able to catalyze lactose hydrolysis and transfer reactions to produce lactose-based prebiotics with potential application in the pharmaceutical and food industry. In this work, Aspergillus lacticoffeatus is described, for the first time, as an effective β-galactosidase producer. The extracellular enzyme production was evaluated in synthetic and alternative media containing cheese whey and corn steep liquor. Although β-galactosidase production occurred in all media (expect for the one composed solely by cheese whey), the highest enzymatic activity values (460U/mL) were obtained for the synthetic medium. Ochratoxin A production in synthetic medium was also evaluated and 9days of fermentation was identified as a suitable fermentation time to obtain a crude extract enzyme with mycotoxin concentration below the legal comparable value established for wine and grape juices (2ng/mL). The optimal pH and temperature for the crude extract enzyme was found in the range of 3.5-4.5 and 50-60°C, respectively. The β-galactosidase activity was reduced in the presence of Ba2+, Fe2+, Li+, K+ and galactose, while additives (except for ascorbic acid) and detergents exhibited a positive effect on enzymatic activity. This enzyme was able to catalyze the synthesis of prebiotics, namely lactulose (2.5g/L) and a galacto-oligosaccharide (trisaccharide, 6.3g/L), either when whole cells or crude enzyme was used as biocatalyst. The lactulose production using fungal whole cells is herein reported for the first time. Additionally, A. lacticoffeatus was also found to produce an enzyme with fructosyltransferase activity and other prebiotics, namely fructo-oligosaccharide 1-kestose (2.4g/L).

KEYWORDS:

Aspergillus lacticoffeatus; Industrial by-products; Ochratoxin A; Prebiotics; Whole cells; β-galactosidase

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