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J Cancer Educ. 2017 Jun 24. doi: 10.1007/s13187-017-1245-0. [Epub ahead of print]

Ovarian Cancer Knowledge in Women and Providers Following Education with Inside Knowledge Campaign Materials.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, Mailstop F-76, Atlanta, GA, 30341, USA. MPuckett1@cdc.gov.
2
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, Mailstop F-76, Atlanta, GA, 30341, USA.
3
Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Cancer Prevention and Control Section, Lansing, MI, 48913, USA.
4
Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Control Program, Madison, WI, 53726, USA.

Abstract

Because no effective methods for preventing or screening for ovarian cancer exist, symptom recognition is integral to its early detection. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts about Gynecologic Cancer campaign was developed to raise awareness and educate women and providers about risk factors, symptoms, recommended screening, and prevention strategies for the five main gynecologic cancers, including ovarian cancer. Inside Knowledge campaign materials were utilized by CDC's National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program grantees to educate women and providers about gynecologic cancer from 2014 to 2015. Grantees recruited participants and held educational sessions using Inside Knowledge materials. Questionnaires were given before and after the sessions to assess changes in awareness, confidence, and behavioral intentions around gynecologic cancer information and analyzed in 2016. This analysis focused on an assessment of changes related to ovarian cancer information. Participants' knowledge increased after educational sessions. Among women, there were increases in correctly identifying that the Papanicolaou (Pap) test does not screen for ovarian cancer (89.2%) and that genetic testing is available (77.9%). There was a lower increase in knowledge that HPV is not a cause of ovarian cancer (56.4%). Providers and women reported significant increases in their confidence in their ability to talk to each other about gynecologic cancer post-session. Ovarian cancer awareness, confidence, and related behaviors increased in participants exposed to Inside Knowledge materials. Using these materials to increase knowledge could lead to more empowered patients, better provider-patient communications, and improved care for gynecologic cancers, including ovarian cancer.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer control; Cancer prevention; Health education; Ovarian cancer

PMID:
28646458
PMCID:
PMC5742303
DOI:
10.1007/s13187-017-1245-0

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