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J Clin Neurosci. 2017 Sep;43:39-46. doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2017.05.022. Epub 2017 Jun 20.

A review of DNA methylation in depression.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, 71 Xinmin Street, Changchun, Jilin Province 130021, PR China.
2
Department of General Internal Medicine, The First Hospital of Jilin University, 71 Xinmin Street, Changchun, Jilin Province 130021, PR China.
3
Department of Cardiology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, 71 Xinmin Street, Changchun, Jilin Province 130021, PR China. Electronic address: zhengyang@jlu.edu.cn.
4
Department of General Internal Medicine, The First Hospital of Jilin University, 71 Xinmin Street, Changchun, Jilin Province 130021, PR China. Electronic address: jiyanleng2013@163.com.

Abstract

As one of the most common psychiatric disorders, depression has been a major public health problem. Growing evidence suggests that epigenetic modification is essential in biological processes of depression. Recently, DNA methylation has been regarded as a potential link between environment and depression. In this review, we reviewed current studies of the association between DNA methylation and depression. The association between DNA methylation of seven genes, including BDNF, SLC6A4, NR3C1, 5-HTR (1A, 2A, and 3A), FKBP5, MAO-A and OXTR, and depression were reviewed in this study. Most studies showed BDNF and NR3C1 gene methylation levels were correlated with depression while the connection of SLC6A4 and depression was conflicting. Although evidence provided insights to epigenetic processes in depression, the findings were inconsistent. Therefore, longitudinal studies in animal models and in patients with depression are needed to further investigate the diagnostic predictive value of DNA methylation reliably.

KEYWORDS:

BDNF; DNA methylation; Depression; NR3C1; SLC6A4

PMID:
28645747
DOI:
10.1016/j.jocn.2017.05.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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