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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2017 Sep 1;178:70-74. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.04.011. Epub 2017 Jun 6.

The neurochemical consequences of methamphetamine self-administration in male and female rats.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84103, United States.
2
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84103, United States; Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069, United States. Electronic address: lisa.mcfadden@usd.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Methamphetamine (METH) is an addictive substance that is used in both males and females. Few preclinical studies have focused on understanding sex-differences in the neurochemical consequences of contingent METH. The purpose of the current study was to investigate potential sex-differences in the neurochemical consequences of METH self-administration.

METHODS:

Male and female adult rats were given extended access to METH or saline self-administration for 7d. Following self-administration, hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) were assessed via western blotting.

RESULTS:

Male and female rats had similar METH intake. METH self-administration reduced striatal DAT in both sexes, but only males that self-administered METH had elevated hippocampal BDNF levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sex-differences exist in the neurochemical consequences of METH self-administration. These differences may lead to sex-specific vulnerability to the toxic effects of METH.

KEYWORDS:

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor; Dopamine transporter; Female; Methamphetamine; Self-administration

PMID:
28645061
PMCID:
PMC5597241
DOI:
10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.04.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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