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Nat Commun. 2017 Jun 23;8:15892. doi: 10.1038/ncomms15892.

Single-virus genomics reveals hidden cosmopolitan and abundant viruses.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, Genetics, and Microbiology, University of Alicante, Carretera San Vicente del Raspeig, San Vicente del Raspeig, Alicante 03690, Spain.
2
Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), The Barcelona Institute for Science and Technology (BIST), Carrer del Doctor Aiguader, 88, PRBB Building, Barcelona 08003, Spain.
3
Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Carrer del Doctor Aiguader, 88, PRBB Building, Barcelona 08003, Spain.
4
Department of Microbiology, The Ohio State University, 105 Biological Sciences Building, 484 West 12th Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA.
5
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, 60 Bigelow Drive, PO Box 380, East Boothbay, Maine 04544, USA.
6
Department of Marine Biology and Oceanography, Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM), CSIC, Passeig Marítim, 47, Barcelona 08003, Spain.
7
Evolutionary Genomics Group, Departamento de Producción Vegetal y Microbiología, Universidad Miguel Hernández, Campus San Juan, San Juan, Alicante 03550, Spain.
8
Department of Civil, Environmental and Geodetic Engineering, The Ohio State University, The Ohio State University, 105 Biological Sciences Building, 484 West 12th Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA.

Abstract

Microbes drive ecosystems under constraints imposed by viruses. However, a lack of virus genome information hinders our ability to answer fundamental, biological questions concerning microbial communities. Here we apply single-virus genomics (SVGs) to assess whether portions of marine viral communities are missed by current techniques. The majority of the here-identified 44 viral single-amplified genomes (vSAGs) are more abundant in global ocean virome data sets than published metagenome-assembled viral genomes or isolates. This indicates that vSAGs likely best represent the dsDNA viral populations dominating the oceans. Species-specific recruitment patterns and virome simulation data suggest that vSAGs are highly microdiverse and that microdiversity hinders the metagenomic assembly, which could explain why their genomes have not been identified before. Altogether, SVGs enable the discovery of some of the likely most abundant and ecologically relevant marine viral species, such as vSAG 37-F6, which were overlooked by other methodologies.

PMID:
28643787
PMCID:
PMC5490008
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms15892
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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