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Arch Sex Behav. 2017 Oct;46(7):2165-2172. doi: 10.1007/s10508-017-1002-9. Epub 2017 Jun 22.

Perceived Devaluation and STI Testing Uptake among a Cohort of Street-Involved Youth in a Canadian Setting.

Author information

1
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, 608-1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 1Y6, Canada.
2
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3, Canada.
3
HIV/STI Surveillance Research Center, and WHO Collaborating Center for HIV Surveillance, Institute for Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, 7616911320, Iran.
4
Clinical Prevention Services, BC Centre for Disease Control, 655 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4R4, Canada.
5
Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, St. Paul's Hospital, 608-1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 1Y6, Canada.
6
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, 608-1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 1Y6, Canada. uhri-kd@cfenet.ubc.ca.
7
School of Public Policy, Simon Fraser University, Suite 3271 - 515 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC, V6B 5K3, Canada. uhri-kd@cfenet.ubc.ca.

Abstract

Perceived devaluation has been shown to have adverse effects on the mental and physical health outcomes of people who use drugs. However, the impact of perceived devaluation on sexually transmitted infections (STI) testing uptake among street-involved youth, who face multiple and intersecting stigmas due to their association with drug use and risky sexual practices, has not been fully characterized. Data were obtained between December 2013 and November 2014 from a cohort of street-involved youth who use illicit drugs aged 14-26 in Vancouver, British Columbia. Multivariable generalized estimating equations were constructed to assess the independent relationship between perceived devaluation and STI testing uptake. Among 300 street-involved youth, 87.0% reported a high perceived devaluation score at baseline. In the multivariable analysis, high perceived devaluation was negatively associated with STI testing uptake after adjustment for potential confounders (Adjusted Odds Ratio = 0.38, 95% Confidence Interval 0.15-0.98). Perceived devaluation was high among street-involved youth in our sample and appears to have adverse effects on STI testing uptake. HIV prevention and care programs should be examined and improved to better meet the special needs of street-involved youth in non-stigmatizing ways.

KEYWORDS:

Homeless youth; Perceived devaluation; Sexual behavior; Sexually transmitted infections; Stigma; Substance use

PMID:
28643100
PMCID:
PMC5548595
[Available on 2018-10-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s10508-017-1002-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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