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Metabolism. 2017 Jul;72:83-93. doi: 10.1016/j.metabol.2017.04.006. Epub 2017 Apr 18.

Social jet-lag potentiates obesity and metabolic syndrome when combined with cafeteria diet in rats.

Author information

1
Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Anatomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, DF 04510, Mexico.
2
Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Anatomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, DF 04510, Mexico; Departamento de Biología Molecular, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología, 14080, México, DF, Mexico.
3
Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, DF 04510, Mexico.
4
Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Anatomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, DF 04510, Mexico. Electronic address: escocarolina@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Modern lifestyle promotes shifted sleep onset and shifted wake up time between weekdays and weekends, producing a condition termed "social-jet lag." Disrupted sleep promotes increased appetite for carbohydrate and fat-rich food, which in long term leads to overweight, obesity and metabolic syndrome. In order to mimic the human situation we produced an experimental model of social-jet lag (Sj-l). With this model, we explored the link between shifted sleep time with consumption of a cafeteria diet (CafD) and the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

The first experiment was designed to create and confirm the model of Sj-l. Rats (n=8-10/group) were exposed to a shifted sleep time protocol achieved by placing the rats in slow rotating wheels from Monday to Friday during the first 4h of the light period, while on weekends they were left undisturbed. The second experiment (n=8-12/group) explored the combined effect of Sj-l with the opportunity to ingest CafD. All protocols lasted 12weeks. We evaluated the development of overweight and indicators of metabolic syndrome. The statistical significance for all variables was set at P<0.05.

RESULTS:

Sj-l alone did not affect body weight gain but induced significant changes in cholesterol in metabolic variables representing a risk factor for metabolic syndrome. Daily restricted access to CafD in the day or night induced glucose intolerance and only CafD during the day led to overweight. Sj-l combined with CafD induced overconsumption of the diet, potentiated body weight gain (16%) and promoted 5 of the criteria for metabolic syndrome including high insulin and dislipidemia.

CONCLUSION:

Present data provide an experimental model of social-jet lag that combined with overconsumption of CafD, and maximized the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Importantly, access to CafD during the night did not lead to overweight nor metabolic syndrome.

KEYWORDS:

Cafeteria diet; Circadian rhythms; Metabolic syndrome; Obesity; Social jet-lag

PMID:
28641787
DOI:
10.1016/j.metabol.2017.04.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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