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J Am Chem Soc. 2017 Jul 5;139(26):8780-8783. doi: 10.1021/jacs.7b01562. Epub 2017 Jun 22.

Common and Potentially Prebiotic Origin for Precursors of Nucleotide Synthesis and Activation.

Author information

1
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Molecular Biology and Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital , 185 Cambridge Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, United States.
2
Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology , 2-12-1-IE-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8550, Japan.
3
Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University , 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, United States.
4
Faculty of Environment and Information Studies, Keio University , 5322 Endo, Fujisawa, Kanagawa 252-0882, Japan.

Abstract

We have recently shown that 2-aminoimidazole is a superior nucleotide activating group for nonenzymatic RNA copying. Here we describe a prebiotic synthesis of 2-aminoimidazole that shares a common mechanistic pathway with that of 2-aminooxazole, a previously described key intermediate in prebiotic nucleotide synthesis. In the presence of glycolaldehyde, cyanamide, phosphate and ammonium ion, both 2-aminoimidazole and 2-aminooxazole are produced, with higher concentrations of ammonium ion and acidic pH favoring the former. Given a 1:1 mixture of 2-aminoimidazole and 2-aminooxazole, glyceraldehyde preferentially reacts and cyclizes with the latter, forming a mixture of pentose aminooxazolines, and leaving free 2-aminoimidazole available for nucleotide activation. The common synthetic origin of 2-aminoimidazole and 2-aminooxazole and their distinct reactivities are suggestive of a reaction network that could lead to both the synthesis of RNA monomers and to their subsequent chemical activation.

PMID:
28640999
PMCID:
PMC6326526
DOI:
10.1021/jacs.7b01562
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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