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Public Health Rep. 2017 Jul/Aug;132(4):496-504. doi: 10.1177/0033354917713470. Epub 2017 Jun 22.

Rates and Correlates of Binge Drinking Among College Students With Disabilities, United States, 2013.

Author information

1
1 University of Memphis, Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology and Research, Memphis, TN, USA.
2
2 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.
3
3 Department of Special Education and Disability Policy, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Our objective was to provide the first comprehensive picture of alcohol use and binge drinking by US college students with disabilities (SWDs), who represent at least 11% (1.6 million) of the US college student population.

METHODS:

In fall 2013, we used a stratified random sampling technique to identify and recruit 2440 SWDs from 122 US colleges and universities. A total of 1285 (53%) SWDs from 61 (50%) colleges and universities completed a survey of alcohol and other drug use and the use of substances by student peers. We conducted 4 multiple logistic regression analyses to compare binge-drinking and non-binge-drinking SWDs by potential correlates of such use and a final model that included only significant variables.

RESULTS:

SWDs aged <21 vs ≥21 (odds ratio [OR] = 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82-0.99) who spent more time vs less time socializing (OR = 1.24; 95% CI, 1.11-1.38), who spent less time vs more time studying (OR = -0.89; 95% CI, -0.80 to -0.99), and who used vs did not use marijuana (OR = 1.44; 95% CI, 1.18-1.75) or amphetamines (OR = 1.82; 95% CI, 1.15-2.89) were significantly more likely to binge drink. SWDs who reported using barbiturates were less likely to binge drink than were those who did not use barbiturates (OR = -0.36; 95% CI, -0.21 to -0.61). In the final model, use of amphetamines (OR = 1.74; 95% CI, 1.15-2.65) or marijuana (OR = 1.60; 95% CI, 1.32-1.94) was the highest predictor of binge drinking.

CONCLUSION:

SWDs' reported rates of binge drinking, although high, were not as high as those of nondisabled college students. Nevertheless, prevention efforts should be targeted toward college SWDs.

KEYWORDS:

alcohol use; binge drinking; outcomes; students with disabilities; substance use

PMID:
28637382
PMCID:
PMC5507432
DOI:
10.1177/0033354917713470
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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