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J Autism Dev Disord. 2018 Apr;48(4):1122-1132. doi: 10.1007/s10803-017-3202-5.

Parent Support of Preschool Peer Relationships in Younger Siblings of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. estesa@uw.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. estesa@uw.edu.
3
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
4
Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
5
Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA.
7
Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
8
The Center for Autism Research, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
9
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
10
Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Abstract

Preschool-aged siblings of children with ASD are at high-risk (HR) for ASD and related challenges, but little is known about their emerging peer competence and friendships. Parents are the main providers of peer-relationship opportunities during preschool. Understanding parental challenges supporting early peer relationships is needed for optimal peer competence and friendships in children with ASD. We describe differences in peer relationships among three groups of preschool-aged children (15 HR-ASD, 53 HR-NonASD, 40 low-risk, LR), and examine parent support activities at home and arranging community-based peer activities. Children with ASD demonstrated precursors to poor peer competence and friendship outcomes. Parents in the HR group showed resilience in many areas, but providing peer opportunities for preschool-age children with ASD demanded significant adaptations.

KEYWORDS:

Autism; High risk; Parent; Peer relations; Preschool; Sibling

PMID:
28634707
PMCID:
PMC5738288
[Available on 2019-04-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-017-3202-5

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